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Mistaken Ideas About Feeding Your Dog

by:
AMANDEEP KAUR MAUJ

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Whenever we have questions about what and how to feed a dog most of the time we find ourselves lacking in knowledge. We are too often misled by a number of generally accepted ideas that have been handed down through the years. Get ready for an eye opener.

I cannot argue with the fact that if you love dogs you tend to see the human aspect of their being. But DOGS ARE NOT HUMAN especially their dietary habits. Dogs are carnivores, although not strict carnivores; they are not omnivores. They digest high-quality vegetable proteins as well as animal proteins, but can also assimilate large quantities of fat, unlike humans. Dogs tolerate starch as an energy source only if it is completely cooked, and in a proportion that takes their physiological limitations into account. A dog's vitamin and mineral needs are also very different from those of its owner (a puppy, for example, needs 400% less vitamin D than a human baby).



When we think of what should go in a dog’s dish we put ourselves in his place, thinking variety is better. Ideally, a dog will eat the same food from the same dish every day at the same time and place exactly the opposite of what you would enjoy! In fact, changing the food too frequently changes the habits that contribute to the dog's well-being, as well as exposing it to digestive problems. The intestinal micro flora is adapted to a specific type of food, and sudden changes do not allow these "targeted" microorganisms enough time to adapt to the new food. This can result in increased production of certain poorly-tolerated metabolites or toxins. For example, adding meat of indifferent quality to the diet increases the action of proteolytic microbes, which causes an alkaline pH, leading to flatulence and diarrhea of varying severity. Thus, variety in a dog's diet is tolerated only within a range of foods that are similar in composition. Otherwise, when changing foods, the change should be implemented gradually over a period of one week.



I am always in favor of balanced nutrition. If you can balance the home made diet nothing like that. Most owners would supplement calcium and multivitamins to the feed as they feel nervous about the growing stages of dogs. Such supplementations can play havoc in life of a pet. More is not better, “balanced is better”. Please check with your vet for the correct feeding practice you should follow in your pet.



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